Kid’s Book Review: “The Thinking Beekeeper” by Christy Hemenway

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I really liked this book  because it was about how to care for the bees in a thoughtful way. From reading other books about beekeeping, I have gotten the feeling that it is more about production and money and less about the bees. It is good to make money, but why not do it in the most humane possible way for the bees as well?

This book taught me a lot. I really like Christy’s perspective, and find myself wanting to study this book carefully. I borrowed it from the library, but I would like to have my own copy when I finally get to work with bees.

10/10 – my first perfect score

 

Learning through play

Kid recently found some driftwood and carved a couple of pieces into boats. He watched them float and move in the water, then he experimented with ways to make them move with more direction and with different speeds.

carving a sailboat

He found some leaves and feathers and attached them to different boats, watching how the wind caught them. The boats with the leaves sailed better than the ones with feathers.

leaf sail

 

When we got home, he put together some more boats from materials he found and added keels too. He then experimented with his new sails and watched how they caught wind and he found ways to improve them more and more.

returning with new boats

The neighborhood kids have also grown interested in his new hobby and they often go to the lake to race their boats. This new hobby has sparked a lot of conversations about engineering between the kids, consistently making their boats better and better.

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This is a video of when he first found the driftwood and was experimenting with it. The light on the water seemed magical and this whole experience has turned out to be quite magical in so many ways.

The long way

We decided to walk to town to do our errands instead of taking the bus. It is a long walk, but the trip along the way is usually an interesting one.

arriving birds

There is a sign placed here in the park that tells us about the ducks and why it is best to not feed them bread.

duck sign

chillin with the geese 2

Visiting his feathered friends makes Kid so happy.

When we got home, we looked up information about the geese and ducks and found out that it is best not to feed them, which makes sense.  Though it is a lot of fun to give them oats, it is also fun to just sit and watch them.

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 Further down the road, we encountered  a dandelion that was so huge! The seeds flew for a very long time and were lifted into the wind very easily.

big dandelion

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 We decided to walk through a garden centre and their Gerberas were wilting, and their soil felt totally dried out.

drooping gerberas

My eldest son ‘Boy’ knows how much I love Gerbera daisies so he found a hose, hooked it up, and dragged it over to water them. He is such a kind-hearted young man.

drooping gerbera 2

.. He helped out a few other plants too.

helping the flowers

It’s no surprise that someone thought he worked there. Boy was able to help the man anyway. This store could use someone like him working there.:)

helping the customer

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Kid discovered that Sumac trees have a flower that bees LOVE. It was fun to watch them up close.

sumac flower

bee on sumac

Bees

Kid has always loved to watch insects and little creatures very closely. Over the past couple of years he has taken a keen interest in bees and is absorbing all sorts of information about them.

bee books

He has learned a lot about keeping bees, and has come to realize that not all hives are equal. There are so many ways to be a humane and healthy beekeeper which is not always commonplace. It is nice to be able to go to the farmer’s market and buy honey from a local apiary who can tell you about their practice.

Kid enthusiastically wants to keep bees, and his great attention to detail with this study makes me want to encourage this passion. This city doesn’t allow urban bee keeping, but I was surprised to learn how many do.  In the meantime, we will try to connect with a local beekeeper and see if we have set up a time to visit their farm.